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Duke volleyball player’s racial slur allegations receive backlash from witnesses: report

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Witnesses reportedly came forward that no racial slurs were heard during last Friday’s BYU-Duke women’s volleyball game, and the Blue Devils’ lone black starter, Duke’s Rachel Richardson, said she was heckled throughout “the whole match.”

Richardson said in a statement that BYU officials were not quick enough to address the situation in response to initial complaints from Duke’s bench. Fan pointed out that he was a Utah Valley University student who sat in the student section and was barred from all athletic fields on campus.

According to the BYU Cougar Chronicle, the university’s conservative student newspaper, “a source within the BYU athletic department” said: Officials briefly discussed and posted police officers there…no further complaints until the end of the match. “

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The NCAA logo will be used at the Division I Women's Volleyball Semifinals on December 19, 2019 at the PPG Paint Arena in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The NCAA logo will be used at the Division I Women’s Volleyball Semifinals on December 19, 2019 at the PPG Paint Arena in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
(Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images)

Chronicle claimed several students who were sitting in the student section during the game “didn’t hear anything at all” and the banned fans didn’t shout racial slurs before being escorted out of the game. rice field.

A BYU spokesperson told Fox News Digital that they were able to confirm the incident last Friday at Smithfield House.

– Just before the third game started, Duke said the first racist remark.

– Individuals were not identified.

– Four event staff were dispatched to talk to the student section and one uniformed police officer.

– There were no complaints from Duke for the rest of the match.

Duke did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital’s request for comment.

Duke Women’s Volleyball Player’s Racial Slander Claims Under Scrutiny

A BYU Athletics official said a fan was taken out of Smithfield House for “disturbing a guest,” but not for yelling racial slurs.

A BYU official said several sports officials are reviewing footage of the game, but have yet to find evidence of racial slurs being shouted.

A detail image of the flag of the Duke Blue Devils during the national anthem before the Kansas Jayhawks and Villanova Wildcats play the 2022 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament Final Four Semifinals in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 2, 2022.

A detail image of the flag of the Duke Blue Devils during the national anthem before the Kansas Jayhawks and Villanova Wildcats play the 2022 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament Final Four Semifinals in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 2, 2022.
(Chris Gracen/Getty Images)

“Various BYU Athletics employees have reviewed video from BYUtv and other cameras at facilities accessible to volleyball teams for film reviews,” a BYU official said in a statement. The ban has been going on since shortly after Friday night’s game, when the ban was on someone Duke identified as using racial slurs, but that person allegedly used slurs at the game. I couldn’t find any evidence.”

BYU Police Lieutenant George Besendorfer confirmed that the initial footage did not indicate that Richardson was prohibited from shouting anything while on duty, so the investigation is still ongoing.

There is also a police report from the BYU Police Department. According to Sergeant Deseret News, Richard Laursen, who stood next to the banned fan throughout the fourth set, said the man “could have (A) sparger’s syndrome or autism.”

The Duke volleyball player has publicly stated that he “failed to adequately” respond to racist slurs from BYU fans.

A BYU track and field official also told the BYU student-led newspaper that the man had a mental disorder.

“When a mentally ill fan approached a Duke player, the Duke team suddenly recognized the disabled man’s ‘voice’ as the same screaming slur,” a BYU Athletics official told The Chronicle. “They never saw a face or pointed it out, just a voice. They banned this guy, not for slander, but for disturbing visitors. BYU Athletics staff said.” We’ve gone through footage of the entire game and the man Duke identified was never sitting in the student section. I don’t know if Mr. Richardson really misheard something or intentionally made up this story, but it certainly doesn’t constitute the criticism BYU has received. There is no evidence that the slander was said. No witnesses, except Mr. Richardson, have appeared.It is unlikely that this person was supposed to have said a slur during ‘every serve.'”

A full view of Lovell Edwards Stadium before the Utah Uts game against the Brigham Young Cougars on September 9, 2017 in Provo, Utah.

A full view of Lovell Edwards Stadium before the Utah Uts game against the Brigham Young Cougars on September 9, 2017 in Provo, Utah.
(Gene Sweeney Jr./Getty Images)

Richardson’s godmother, Letha Pamplin, claimed in a tweet that the volleyball player was called a racial slur “every time he served.” “Watch her go to the team bus,” he tweeted.

A police report obtained by the Salt Lake Tribune said threatening voicemails were also left at the BYU coach on Sunday. A banned man was identified as the person who allegedly shouted

BYU Athletic Director Tom Holmoe asked students to provide information about the incident.

“BYU Athletics renounces prejudicial attitudes and behavior of all kinds and is committed to eradicating racism,” the university said in a statement last Saturday.

A full view of Lovell Edwards Stadium before the Utah Uts game against the Brigham Young Cougars on September 9, 2017 in Provo, Utah.

A full view of Lovell Edwards Stadium before the Utah Uts game against the Brigham Young Cougars on September 9, 2017 in Provo, Utah.
(Gene Sweeney Jr./Getty Images)

“I cannot say enough words to say that I was very disappointed by the behavior of a small number of fans at the BYU-Duke volleyball game last night at Smith Fieldhouse. We condone this type of behavior. I won’t.”

Speaking on ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” on Tuesday, Richardson claimed the abuse had escalated by the fourth set.

“Even black teammates who were on the bench and weren’t playing, they were being called out and pointed at. I was really confused as to why,” she said.

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“We stand against any form of racism, bigotry and hatred,” Duke Volleyball said in a statement Sunday. “As a program, we want our student-athletes to feel heard and supported.” However, we have worked extensively to create an inclusive and safe environment that is not naive to the fact that there is always work to be done.”

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